Quality Windows, Siding and Doors Since 1976 1-866-4FELDCO® | Customer Support
  • NARI Member - National Association of the Remodeling Industry
  • energy star certified logo
  • all Feldco products are EPA certified to be lead safe
  • osi certified installer
  • window and door magazine dealer of the year
mobile call button

How Awning Windows Enable Fresh Air Year-Round

Awning windows have been around for centuries, and for good reason.  Versatile and functionable, the style of these windows really hasn’t changed since their original debut.  Homeowners continue to choose them for portions of their homes because of their slew of benefits, thus retaining the popularity of the awning style in the world of windows.

backyard view from an awning window

The Awning Style

Awning windows are ideal for low level spots where a regular double-hung or single-hung window would be too large.  You’ll see awning windows in basements or bathrooms often, as even small spaces and below-ground rooms need natural light and a fresh breeze just the same as the rest of the house.

This style of window operates like a casement window, and both are commonly used in narrower wall spaces.  Their differences lie in how they operate.  An awning window has the same mechanical crank just like that of a casement window, only these windows open from the bottom when the crank is turned, with their top edge fixed permanently in place.  The awning window’s bottom pivots up and down.

The awning style can easily be confused with the similar style of the casement window.  Casement windows have the same operator crank as their awning style cousin but instead of opening from bottom, casement windows crank horizontally on their hinges, mounted on one side at their top and bottom.  Essentially, casement windows open like a door, with one side set in frame to remain stationary as the window is cranked open.

Ultimately, you can open the awning window and keep it open through any season, its climate, and its weather.  But because the casement window opens in similar fashion to a door, rainwater, debris, and snow can make its way through, so these windows must be closed during adverse weather conditions (unless you want wet floors and water damage).

awning window

Energy Efficiency & A Year-Round Breeze

The awning’s design allows for a homeowner to prop open their awning windows year-round, no matter the weather.  The design is as its name suggests: an awning.  The way the window juts outward and makes a temporary slope that can be cranked inward and outward repels water, snow, and falling debris with ease.  The design is similar to a roof—only one that can be controlled.

For wet climates, this means that an awning window can remain open throughout the year without fear of water damage or leakage.  Small awning windows are too narrow for intruders, too, so privacy and security aren’t concerns if a homeowner wants to open them without fear of compromising their safety.

The awning window is a wise choice when it comes to energy efficiency.  Homeowners know that by selecting an awning styled window for a room, they’ll be able to enjoy fresh air year-round.  That means shutting off the air conditioning and opening up a window to let the breeze pass through instead, saving on energy output and on monthly energy bills.

Benefits Abound When Closed or Open

According to the Department of Energy, there are multiple factors to still consider in all window types, not just your awning windows, when it comes to energy efficiency.  Although awning windows are energy efficient already with their ability to cool a home year-round and despite poor weather by remaining open, their frame composition, glass, and gas filling are still contributing features to their overall energy efficiency.

The most standard frame for windows of all styles is the vinyl frame, and because they can be filled with insulation, this modern frame can be manufactured to be superior to other materials like wood.  The most energy efficient awning window should be comprised of insulated vinyl, fiberglass (which can also be insulated), or composite, which lasts longer than traditional wood.

When your awning windows are shut, you’ll need to consider its glass construction for the ultimate energy conservation.  When buying new windows, you’ll see ratings like low-emissivity rating—“low-e.”  So, awning windows with a low-e coating will save you more in the long run even if you paid a little more for them up front.

If you have an awning window that’s gas-filled, you’re looking at even more energy savings.  Argon or krypton are the two main gases used in the space between glazing layers.  While the energy savings will just be at work when you close your awning window, you can expect to save a lot over time if your windows have all of these features.  Another benefit of awning windows, according to the Department of Energy, is that they have a lower air leakage rate than sliding windows because the sash presses snug against the frame when they’re closed.

Kitchen Awning Windows

Rain or Shine

Not all homeowners live in a climate that allows them to keep their windows open year-round, but if you’re one of these lucky ones, an awning window is perfect for you.  This style can be left open in rain or shine, and when closed, you can expect some serious energy savings.  Overall—a win-win.

A Wise Investment for Your Home

Replacing your windows doesn’t have to be a nightmare that it’s so often made out to be.  When you learn about options like vinyl windows, replacements start to not only seem like a good idea, but a smart investment for your home.

When the time comes for replacement windows, Feldco has you covered. We’ve been serving the Midwest for over 40 years and have earned the title of America’s #1 window and door company.

We have many showrooms across the Midwest and that’s why we have helped over 400,000 homeowners with their home improvement goals. Speak to a product specialist and get a free quote online today.

Get a Free Quote

It's easy, fast and completely free. Get started below:

Yes, Quote Me! No, I'm Not Ready Yet